Inclusion Terms & Definitions

Choose a term or scroll down for full listing:

A – H I – P Q – Z
Accessible Identity-First Language Respectful Language
Accommodations Inclusion
Conflicting Uses of Language Oppression
Discriminate Person-First Language
Exemptions to Proportionate Populations Physically Accessible
Flexible and Accessible Prejudice
Proportionate Population

 

Full List of Terms and Definitions


Accessible:

Aany person, regardless of how they get around (by walking, using a wheelchair, scooter, crutches, or other mobility aides) is able to get into, and move around within, all the places that they may need to get to. This may include having ramps and elevators instead of, or along with, any stairs used to get into the place. It also means that doorways, hallways, spaces between furniture, and bathrooms, that people using wheelchairs or other mobility equipment can maneuver. There should also be accessible bathrooms and parking relatively close to the meeting place, as a lack of these could hinder participation. The sensory aspects of the meeting location’s environment should also be accessible. This means that lighting should ideally be natural, but at the least not fluorescent. Background noise should be minimized, and there should not be heavy perfumes, chemicals, or other harsh or artificial scents. The temperature should be a moderate, comfortable temperature. Visually, the room should be calm and without too much visual clutter or harshly colored on contrasting or reflective surfaces.

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Accommodations:

Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to: providing large-print or Braille materials, a sign language interpreter, a peer-aide system, adaptive physical equipment for participation in certain activities, noise cancelling headphones, etc.

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Conflicting uses of language:

As can be seen by comparing Person First Language and Identity First Language, people have conflicting ideas of how to use language regarding disabilities, and there are arguments in favor of and against the various methods. Individuals can decide for themselves which type of language they prefer; the most important thing is that language is used knowledgably and respectfully. And of course, if a person requests to have a particular method of language used to speak to or about them, that request should be respected and obliged.

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Discriminate:

To treat unfairly, usually because of some aspect of the person’s identity, be it race, sex, gender, sexuality, religion, class, age or disability status. For this reason, discrimination is usually an unfair act against a person stemming from prejudice.

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Exemptions to proportionate populations:

In cases of exemptions to proportionate populations, the exemption applies only to the area that the limited service applies to. For example, in the case of the Women Scholars’ Clubs, the club will have a disproportionately large female population, but should still be proportionate in all other terms: race, class, sexuality, religion, and disability.

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Flexible and Accessible:

This will mean that there are always multiple possible ways to access a club resource, such as providing information in both written and verbal formats. It also means that there are multiple options for participation in activities that members can select the option that best suits them. For example, instead of asking for on-the-spot speeches or presentations, members are given the opportunity and advance notice to be able to create offline versions of their presentations if they wish, such as a video. Another example would be the option of using headphones at a movie viewing, or for a bowling event to have lanes both with and without bumpers and ball ramps.

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Identity-First Language:

http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/

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Inclusion:

All people have equal opportunity to participate. Creating an environment in which everyone can feel like they belong is a top priority. There is a focus on cooperation over competition. There is an understanding that differences between people (including race, ethnicity, sex, gender, sexuality, religion, age, class, and disability) are a natural part of life, and all functions operate on the assumption that everyone can be successful.

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Oppression:

Widespread unjust treatment against a group of people based on that group’s (dis)ability status, race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, or age.

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Person-First language:

http://disabilityisnatural.com/images/PDF/pfl09.pdf

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Physically Accessible:

Any person, regardless of how they get around (walking or by using a wheelchair, scooter, crutches, or other mobility aides) is able to get into, and move around within, all the places that they may need to get to. This may include having ramps and elevators instead of, or along with, any stairs used to get into the place. It also means that doorways, hallways, spaces between furniture, and bathrooms, that people using wheelchairs or other mobility equipment can maneuver. There should also be accessible bathrooms and parking relatively close to the meeting place, as a lack of these could hinder participation.

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Prejudice:

To make judgments about a person or group of people before meeting or fully understanding the person or people. Prejudice is often based on stereotypes and preconceived opinions rather than true experience or fact.

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Proportionate Population:

To have the same diversity of people in the subgroup (in this case, a club or organization) as the whole population (in this case, the school or community the club or organization serves). For example, if a club serves a school where 1 in 6 students (including those in special education) has a disability, then about 1 in 6 club members will have a disability.

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Respectful Language:

Respectful language always requires that if a person has specified a preference for certain language when speaking to or about them, then that is the language that is used. See Person First Language, Identity First Language for an introduction on language to begin learning about respectful language relating to disability.

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